Trixie Laumonte: photos from a 50-year career


trixie laumonte

During her almost 50-year drag career, Trixie Laumonte was one of Australia’s most visible trans women. 🏳️‍⚧️

She began in entertainment at Les Girls as a 15-year-old. Like many early Les Girls, she carried for a lifetime the lessons she learned there on dance, costume and holding an audience. Even in her later years, when younger queens marvelled that a drag performer could get away with slacks and flats onstage, Trixie never looked less than spectacular.

Trixie Laumonte’s family arrived in Australia from England when she was just 10. The family thrived in their new home but at 14, Trixie was expelled from her Sydney school for effeminacy.

“I was always feminine, a wrist-flapper from way back.

“But I always liked sport and at school played all the normal boys games like soccer.”

Putting school behind her, Trixie worked as a waiter and, within a few months, joined the cast of Les Girls.

“Mum said to me she had noticed I was very much like a girl and that I was looking at boys the way a girl would.

“She said that if I thought I would be happier as a girl, then she and Dad would help me.

“They went with me to buy a whole new set of clothes, and then they took me to doctors to start the treatment that was required.”

At the time of that interview, Trixie was about to undergo surgery to replace her silicone breast implants with a more modern substance.

“[The silicone] takes its temperature not from your body but from the outside temperature. So, it it’s a cold night, you have cold, hard tits!”

Anyone who ever met Trixie can no doubt hear her voice saying ‘cold, hard tits’.

trixie laumonte
Trixie appeared in this advertisement in an early queer publication.

Australian Queer Archives

Trixie’s photo albums, old newspaper clippings, Les Girls menus and other ephemera will soon go to the Australian Queer Archives where they will form a permanent memorial to one of Australia’s most sensational showgirls.

QNews is grateful to Pete for giving us access to the collection and sharing his memories of a cherished friend.❤️ 🧡💛💚💙💜🏳️‍⚧️

We’ve focussed today on pics from earlier in the legendary showgirl’s career.

trixie laumonte
Trixie with a male dancer. As a young showgirl, she was renowned for her love of a bejewelled bikini set.
“Trixie started at Les Girls at 15 years of age and stayed there for 7 years.”
Trixie (blonde at right) with fellow ‘female impersonators’ Ruby Kerr (left) and Kali Sue (seated) in a Brisbane paper during the seventies.
“Cruise the harbour, not the streets…”
trixie laumonte
Random Album Page
Trixie with Bernard King
trixie laumonte
Speaking out on behalf of a beleaguered regional community in the 1980s.

Les Girl great and Valley legend moved to palliative care.

Trixie Laumonte passes away in palliative care.

More of the greats of Australian Drag History:

The pre-Drag Race all-stars down under – Aussie herstory.

Lindsay Kemble: Adelaide’s drag queen war hero.

Charles Holt, drag war hero – a proud ANZAC.

1942: Lea Sonia, world’s greatest female impersonator.

 

For the latest LGBTIQA+ Sister Girl and Brother Boy news, entertainment, community stories in Australia, visit qnews.com.au. Check out our latest magazines or find us on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Destiny Rogers

Destiny Rogers embarked on her career in the media industry immediately after high school, initially joining Mirror News, which later evolved into News Ltd. She fondly recalls editing Ian Byford's 'Passing Glances: A History of Gay Cairns' as one of her most fulfilling projects. Additionally, Destiny co-researched and co-wrote 'The Queen's Ball', chronicling the history of the world's longest-running continuous queer event. Her investigative work on the history of Australia's COON Cheese and Edward Coon culminated in the publication 'COON: More Holes than Swiss Cheese', a collaborative effort with Dr. Stephen Hagan. Destiny's journey at QNews began as a feature writer, and she was subsequently elevated to the role of Managing Editor of QNews Magazine in 2018. However, in July 2022, she decided to resign from this role to refocus on research and feature writing. For contact, please reach out at destinyr@qnews.com.au.

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