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lgbtiq history

From the dawn of time until modern days, history recorded instances of same sex love, diverse sexualities and genders. LGBTIQ history documents the people and culture of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer people throughout time. Most ancient civilisations left stories of same-sex love and gender diversity. Many documented people often referred to as third gender, usually people we now describe as intersex or transgender. While the Middle Ages gifted us increasing documentation of LGBTIQ history, at that time, persecution of LGBTIQ people increased. During the Renaissance, the oppression of LGBTIQ people by the Catholic Church increased. Many European countries imposed the death penalty for homosexual acts. Lighter punishments often included some form of mutilation, for both men and women. The serious study of homosexuality began in Europe in the 1700s. The German novelist Karl-Maria Kertbeny first used the word homosexual in print in 1869. It derives from the Greek homos meaning same, not the Latin homo, meaning man.  Thus the word describes both male and female same-sex attracted people. After the Stonewall Riots in New York, considered the beginning of the modern LGBTIQ Rights movement, LGBTIQ communities began to combine in more formal organisations than previously. From the 1980s on, many countries of the western world decriminalised homosexuality. Reforms also took place regarding same-sex marriage, and other LGBTIQ rights. The increased visibility of LGBTIQ people obviously led to greater documentation of them and their culture. LGBTIQ historians also made increasing efforts to reclaim their own history. As a result of censorship and oppression much LGBTIQ history is lost. In addition to the accidental loss of history common to all communities, LGBTIQ history was subject to deliberate destruction in a process known as gay erasure.  

christine forster former PM Tony Abbott homophobe and misogynist

His sister accused critics of the former PM Tony Abbott of ‘scoring cheap political points’ in a weekend tweet. Christine Forster castigated those who describe the new British trade advisor as a ‘homophobe and misogynist’ without knowing him. However, Forster neglected to address the many incidents and comments that inspired the accusations. Abbott’s appointment proved …

the cooyar tragedy gay panic defence

2020 marks the 100th anniversary of The Cooyar Tragedy, perhaps Australia’s first example of gay panic defence. The newspapers of the day gave that name to the murder north of Toowoomba in 1920 of David Frederick Hawes (Fred). The man charged with the murder, Henry Arthur Dale (Harry), pleaded Not Guilty based on what we …

adelaide lord mayor george duncan decriminalisation

Adelaide’s Lord Mayor has honoured the memory of Dr George Duncan, whose tragic 1972 death precipitated South Australia’s nation-leading decriminalisation of homosexuality. Lord Mayor Sandy Verschoor on Monday unveiled a new sign sharing Dr Duncan’s story, next to his permanent memorial near the Adelaide University footbridge on Victoria Drive. July 20 would have been the …

pompo christie Palmerston atherton tablelands

As #BlackLivesMatter protests continue across the world, statues commemorating divisive historical figures come under fire. At Milla Milla on the Atherton Tablelands, a statue commemorates two people, one white and the other Aboriginal. The white man is Christie Palmerston, a noted explorer, and the Aboriginal is his ‘companion’ Pompo. Milla Milla sits at the top …

queens ball book dame sybil von thorndyke longest-running continuous lgbtiq+ event brisbane queens ball

The Queens Ball book, launched as a PDF on Saturday, documents the longest-running continuous LGBTIQ+ event in the world. Proceeds from book sales will fund an annual award in honour of Brisbane Queens Ball founder, Dame Sybil von Thorndyke. Scroll down for purchase link Publisher Bill Rutkin OAM said the book will go into print …

queens ball awards queensland brisbane community activist lgbtiq

In the early days of Australia’s COVID-19 restrictions, QNews approached the Brisbane Pride Festival Committee about the possibility that it might prove impossible to hold a Queens Ball in 2020. The committee will now host the Queens Ball Virtual Awards on 27 June. The same day will also see Global Pride. Earlier, QNews will present …

lgbtiq history australian lgbtiq history timeline 1902 2000

The Australian LGBTIQ history timeline of the twentieth century begins with male homosexuality prosecuted as a criminal act in every jurisdiction of the newly federated Commonwealth. However, the last 30 years of the century saw every one of those laws consigned to history. While the law only explicitly criminalised male homosexuality, all members of the …

Kamp Kult secret history same-sex marriage 1930s

Just days before Christmas 1931, the Arrow newspaper regaled its readers with the story of Sydney’s Kamp Kult.  The paper marvelled at lavish ceremonies including the coronation of a Queen and same-sex weddings. At the time, Sydney suffered in the throes of the Great Depression. Men struggled to find employment and riots broke out over …

200-year-old diary matthew tomlinson

A historian examining the 200-year-old diary of a Yorkshire farmer discovered previously missed entries arguing for increased tolerance towards homosexuality. Matthew Tomlinson’s diary covers the period from 1806 until 1839.  It found its way into the Wakefield Library sometime before the 1950s. Matthew Tomlinson lived from about 1770 until 1850. A widower at the time …

gay love letter

Most of what we know of LGBTIQ Australians in the colonial era comes from court and prison records. Australia’s earliest known gay love letter is no different. Indeed, it is the letter of a convict to the person he loved most — a man he knew he would never see again. Denis Prendergast (or Pendergast) …

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