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lgbtiq history

From the dawn of time until modern days, history recorded instances of same sex love, diverse sexualities and genders. LGBTIQ history documents the people and culture of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer people throughout time. Most ancient civilisations left stories of same-sex love and gender diversity. Many documented people often referred to as third gender, usually people we now describe as intersex or transgender. While the Middle Ages gifted us increasing documentation of LGBTIQ history, at that time, persecution of LGBTIQ people increased. During the Renaissance, the oppression of LGBTIQ people by the Catholic Church increased. Many European countries imposed the death penalty for homosexual acts. Lighter punishments often included some form of mutilation, for both men and women. The serious study of homosexuality began in Europe in the 1700s. The German novelist Karl-Maria Kertbeny first used the word homosexual in print in 1869. It derives from the Greek homos meaning same, not the Latin homo, meaning man.  Thus the word describes both male and female same-sex attracted people. After the Stonewall Riots in New York, considered the beginning of the modern LGBTIQ Rights movement, LGBTIQ communities began to combine in more formal organisations than previously. From the 1980s on, many countries of the western world decriminalised homosexuality. Reforms also took place regarding same-sex marriage, and other LGBTIQ rights. The increased visibility of LGBTIQ people obviously led to greater documentation of them and their culture. LGBTIQ historians also made increasing efforts to reclaim their own history. As a result of censorship and oppression much LGBTIQ history is lost. In addition to the accidental loss of history common to all communities, LGBTIQ history was subject to deliberate destruction in a process known as gay erasure.  

Dr Albert W Noll

The author came across Dr Albert W Noll while researching the recent publication COON: more holes than swiss cheese. The young Boston dentist enjoyed notoriety for his appearances on the Boston stage during the 1890s. He usually performed in drag, either as a white woman or in blackface as a ‘mammy’ caricature. Born into Boston …

fake news semen toothpaste

This writer has always remembered an article from an Australian gay publication during the early years of the AIDS crisis. It reported on an American dental association’s cover-up of research into semen toothpaste. It claimed five pages of the association’s recent newsletter remained blank after omitting a report on the study. For some reason, the …

ned kelly

Although a national icon, Ned Kelly remains something of an enigma. The most famous bushranger of them all stares out at the world through a slit in his armour plate helmet and everyone makes of him what they will. Despite Red and Ellen Kelly not registering Ned’s birth, documentation indicates a December 1854 birthdate. In …

garry wotherspoon clive madigan gay looking glass

In Through the Gay Looking Glass: The Many Lives of Clive Madigan, historian Garry Wotherspoon takes us on a joyous romp through post-World War II gay Sydney. “Giggles and squeals pierced the night air as they tripped daintily along the platform of the North Strathfield railway station. High-stepping little things in ‘drag’ (women’s clothing to …

henry bramston john bramston robert herbert confirmed bachelor

When Robert Herbert and John Bramston sailed home to England after six years in the new colony of Queensland, John’s younger brother remained. A ‘confirmed bachelor’, Henry Bramston played a prominent role in Brisbane life but was quickly forgotten after his death. Robert Herbert, private secretary to Sir George Bowen, arrived in Brisbane in November …

gay heritage john dobinson herston

Independent candidate for the Brisbane inner-city electorate of McConnel, John Dobinson, has called for Herston to become Queensland’s first gay heritage inclusion. Queensland’s first Premier Robert Herbert and partner John Bramston made their home together in the area. They conjoined their names to invent a name for their property. That name survives as the name …

James Randi Don Lane Australian TV piss off

James Randi, the magician and debunker of mind-reading and faith-healing charlatans, died yesterday aged 92. Randi took centre-place in one of the most iconic moments on Australian television when late-night TV host Don Lane stormed out of an interview. As he stomped off the set the ‘lanky yank’ uttered a phrase then considered too shocking …

Herston Robert Herbert John Bramston gay premier henry bramston confirmed bachelor

In the century when ‘the love that dare not speak its name’ became a euphemism for homosexuality, Queensland’s first premier and his longtime male companion enjoyed a companionship that not only spoke its name but bequeathed it to posterity. Robert Herbert and John Bramston combined their two surnames into one and named the home they …

maypole mandala australia same-sex commune david johnstone australia gay and lesbian archives alga

An amazing new digital exhibition explores over a century of queer history in the Tweed in northern New South Wales. Tweed Regional Museum launched the project, titled Small Town Queer, to coincide with LGBTI History Month in October. The collection explores Tweed’s “rich tapestry” of queer history from the early 1900s to the present. The …

campaign against moral persecution bill rutkin

QNews welcomes letters from our readers on any subject relevant to our glorious communities. Please address to contact@QNews.com.au with subject line ‘Letters’.  Today, Bill Rutkin writes on the progress of our communities in the half-century since the formation of Campaign Against Moral Persecution and where to from here. Robert French: Campaign Against Moral Persecution Today …

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