Homophobic Attack Victim Pleads for others


homophobic attack
Image: Facebook

One of the women bashed in a homophobic attack on a London bus last week, called on the community to oppose all anti-LGBTIQ crimes. The victim, known only as Chris, made the call in an opinion piece in The Guardian. Also, she challenged readers to care about all homophobia and transphobia.

In response to Chris and her date refusing to kiss for a group of young men, the men bashed and robbed them.

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Subsequently, news outlets worldwide shared photos of the two women’s bloody faces.

“The photo of me and my date went viral after our attack,” wrote Chris.

“But only as we’re white, feminine and cisgender.”

“Sympathy and action must be for all.”

Despite the assault, Chris wrote she understood her various privileges usually protect her.

She is at less risk than others, because of her “race, health, education, and conventional gender presentation.”

She noted that the media attention was because she and her partner are attractive white women.

Homophobic attacks usually target minorities

“In both my native United States and here in the United Kingdom, it always has been and still
is open season on the bodies of (in no specific order) people of colour, indigenous people,
transgender people, disabled people, queer people, poor people, women and migrants.”

“The press coverage, and timely law enforcement response, was not coincidental to our
complexions,” she wrote.

“Neither was the disproportionate online reaction over the victimisation of a pretty brunette
and blonde.

“The commodification and exploitation of my face came at the expense of other victims
whose constant persecution apparently does not warrant similar moral outrage.”

Because of this, she called on members of the community to show the same outrage for other people. Particularly trans women, people of colour and other marginalised groups suffer

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“Make the extraordinary reaction to our attack the norm,” Chris wrote.

“Learn the names and stories of Muhlaysia Booker, Dana Martin, Chanel Scurlock.

“Elevate those who have been advocating for the basic rights and safety of communities
marginalised by our existing political, economic and social structures long before I got
punched in the face.

“Finding the right leaders takes some research and real-world activity.

‘Their frequent absence from today’s headlines is not coincidental to their crusades.

“Stand up for yourselves and each other, and fight back.”

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