Tasmanian trans advocate celebrates birth certificate milestone


tasmania transgender martine delaney birth certificate gender reform
Photo: Michael Dempsey

Tasmanian transgender woman Martine Delaney has become the first to receive a birth certificate affirming her true gender under the state’s historic gender reforms.

The new laws passed the state’s parliament in April and came into effect on Friday. They allow trans and gender diverse Tasmanians to amend sex markers on birth certificates without surgery or remove them altogether.

Advertisements

Delaney (pictured) says the state’s gender reforms are the most progressive in Australia and among the best in the world.

“Finally, it’s real. Transgender Tasmanians can now have identity documents that reflect who we really are without the need for expensive and sometimes dangerous surgery,” she said on Tuesday.

“At a personal level, this is important because for the first time in my life my birth certificate reflects who I really am.

“It is also important because it is the culmination of a struggle, lasting almost a generation, to have equity for transgender and gender diverse Tasmanians.”

She said her updated birth certificate is proof that the Tasmanian parliament “cares about all Australians”.

“The sky hasn’t fallen in. And it’s now a little easier for transgender and gender diverse Tasmanians to be who we really are.”

Other states and territories should follow Tasmania’s lead

Martine Delaney has campaigned for transgender and gender diverse equality for over sixteen years.

On Friday, she said staff at the Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages gallantly battled plumbing issues to ensure the first day of birth certificate amendments went smoothly.

Staff also wore lanyards in the blue, white and pink colours of the transgender flag to show their support.

Now, Delaney wants all other Australian states and territories to follow Tasmania’s lead with similar laws. Doing so will create “a more inclusive and equal society for everyone, regardless of gender identity,” she said.

Late last month, similar laws also passed the Victorian parliament. But unfortunately Queensland is lagging behind.

Read more: Why reforming birth certificates matters to gender diverse people

For the latest lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ) news in Australia, visit qnews.com.au. Check out our latest magazines or find us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.