Anna Wintour Slams Margaret Court And Scott Morrison For Their LGBTIQ Views


Anna Wintour Margaret Court

Fashion icon Anna Wintour has slammed tennis legend Margaret Court and Prime Minister Scott Morrison for their views on LGBTIQ rights.

Delivering a keynote speech at the Australian Open Inspirational Series in Melbourne, the Vogue editor-in-chief questioned whether the tennis star’s name should be on Victoria’s Margaret Court Arena.

Advertisements

Court, who is now a pastor, has repeatedly made headlines for her homophobic comments, including comparing the “gay lobby” to Hitler for trying to “get in the minds of children” and suggesting gender diversity is “all the devil”.

“I find it is inconsistent with the sport for Margaret Court’s name to be on the stadium that does so much to bring all people together across their differences,” Wintour said, according to the Herald Sun.

“This much I think is clear to anyone who understands the spirit and joy of the game. Intolerance has no place in tennis.

“What we love in the stands is watching these remarkable men and women exceed themselves while being themselves in many different forms.

“Margaret Court was a champion on the court but a meeting point for players of all nations preferences and backgrounds should celebrate somebody that was a champion off it as well.”

In the speech, Wintour spoke of her admiration for Australia’s support of women in sport and praised Australia for legalising same-sex marriage, saying “the world sang in celebration with you.”

But world leaders, including Prime Minister Scott Morrison, needed to step up on LGBTIQ rights, she said, pointing to Australia’s protracted debate about LGBTIQ students and staff in religious schools.

“Some responsibility rests with those of us who have opportunities to lead, whether in sport, in business, or like those of us in journalism with a voice,” she said.

“Like many of you I have been alarmed by your Prime Minister’s record on LGBTQ rights, which seems backward in all senses that no one can be expelled from school for their orientation should not require clarification.

“A government should protect its people and not make it unclear whether they will be accepted. We are struggling with these issues in the US too.

“Fortunately though opportunities for leadership and change extend beyond the leaders of the moment.

“There are many different paths towards change and all of us can make immediate strides.”